112 Matches Found, 1 thru 100 on this page.
Maker - Item# - Scale Description
CORGI - AA27005 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Westland Puma HC.1 Helicopter 72 Squadron, Aldergrove 1997

This model features:
- Rotorspan approximately 8" - Rotating propellers
- Optional undercarriage down
- Detailed crew figure
- Sliding door
[Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA27107 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Messerschmitt BF109G-6 - Kurt Gabler JG300 "Red 8" [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA27304 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Hawker Fury K2065 1 Squadron - 100 Years of RAF [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA27604 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Hawker Hurricane MKI, V7795, Plt Off William 'Cherry' Vale, RAF 80 Sqn, Maleme, Crete, 1941

As strong German forces moved to secure their southern flank and rectify a failed Italian attempt to invade Greece, Allied forces found themselves in a steady retreat towards Crete. Extensive air operations saw large numbers of RAF aircraft engaged in fighting with both German and Italian air force units and despite initial successes, the came under increasing pressure.

Perhaps the most successful Hawker Hurricane Mk.I fighter of this difficult period was V7795, usually flown by Pilot Officer William Vale, of No.80 Squadron, Royal Air Force. Still displaying its standard RAF day fighter camouflage scheme, this unusual aircraft also included some additional field applied camouflage modifications to the leading edge and engine cowling, which were applied to just a small number of Hurricanes. Vale claimed eight enemy aircraft destroyed whilst flying this aircraft, during April and May 1941.

Following the success of the Hawker Hurricane during the Battle of Britain, it soon became clear that the Spitfire had the greatest potential for future development, which released the Hurricane for other duties. The rugged design of the Hurricane and numbers available to the RAF saw many machines sent overseas and as the war began to spread across the globe, so did the influence of the dependable Hurricane. From North Africa to Russia, the Hurricane continued to provide sterling service and continued to destroy Axis aircraft and military vehicles. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA27605 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Hawker Hurricane MKI, P3576 J. B. Nicholson VC, 249 Squadron, August 1940

Following the success of the Hawker Hurricane during the Battle of Britain, it soon became clear that the Spitfire had the greatest potential for future development, which released the Hurricane for other duties. The rugged design of the Hurricane and numbers available to the RAF saw many machines sent overseas and as the war began to spread across the globe, so did the influence of the dependable Hurricane. From North Africa to Russia, the Hurricane continued to provide sterling service and continued to destroy Axis aircraft and military vehicles. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA27606 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Hawker Hurricane MKI, YB-J, ‘Winged Popeye’ P.O. Leonard Walter Stevens No.17 Sqn, Debden, 1940

Following the success of the Hawker Hurricane during the Battle of Britain, it soon became clear that the Spitfire had the greatest potential for future development, which released the Hurricane for other duties. The rugged design of the Hurricane and numbers available to the RAF saw many machines sent overseas and as the war began to spread across the globe, so did the influence of the dependable Hurricane. From North Africa to Russia, the Hurricane continued to provide sterling service and continued to destroy Axis aircraft and military vehicles. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA27607 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Hawker Hurricane MK. I - v6799 McKenz - 100 Years of RAF [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA27703 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge North American Mustang Mk.IV, Werner Christie, No.150 Wing, RAF Hunsdon, 1945

As its history was very much connected to British requirements, it is no surprise that the Mustang was used extensively by the Royal Air Force during WWII, from the early Allison powered Mustang I, to the Dallas produced, Packard Merlin powered IVa. The final victory for a WWII RAF Mustang belonged to Norwegian ace Werner Christie, who was flying his personal machine KH790. Following the conclusion of a successful bomber escort mission over Germany, Christie led his Mustangs in search of Luftwaffe fighters. Flying above Finow airfield, he noticed a flight of Fw 190s and immediately dived to attack. His first burst of fire caught the wing of an unsuspecting Focke Wulf, blowing half of the wing off and sending the fighter spiralling into the ground. This would be Christie’s eleventh and final victory of the war.

Regarded as one of the most successful aircraft of all time and something of an American classic, the Mustang actually came into production following a British requirement for additional fighters. Rather than licence build the Curtiss P-40 fighters the British were looking for, North American Aviation promised a totally new aircraft, which would be superior to the P-40. A proud boast from this relatively new manufacturer, but could they pull it off? In record time, they built a prototype aircraft which showed great promise and the British immediately placed a large order. Originally powered by the American Allison V-1710 engine, the Mustang I was faster than the Spitfire an [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA27705 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge North American Mustang P51-D "Hurry Home Honey", 44-1473 364th F/Squadron 357th Fighter Group

As its history was very much connected to British requirements, it is no surprise that the Mustang was used extensively by the Royal Air Force during WWII, from the early Allison powered Mustang I, to the Dallas produced, Packard Merlin powered IVa. The final victory for a WWII RAF Mustang belonged to Norwegian ace Werner Christie, who was flying his personal machine KH790. Following the conclusion of a successful bomber escort mission over Germany, Christie led his Mustangs in search of Luftwaffe fighters. Flying above Finow airfield, he noticed a flight of Fw 190s and immediately dived to attack. His first burst of fire caught the wing of an unsuspecting Focke Wulf, blowing half of the wing off and sending the fighter spiralling into the ground. This would be Christie’s eleventh and final victory of the war.

Regarded as one of the most successful aircraft of all time and something of an American classic, the Mustang actually came into production following a British requirement for additional fighters. Rather than licence build the Curtiss P-40 fighters the British were looking for, North American Aviation promised a totally new aircraft, which would be superior to the P-40. A proud boast from this relatively new manufacturer, but could they pull it off? In record time, they built a prototype aircraft which showed great promise and the British immediately placed a large order. Originally powered by the American Allison V-1710 engine, the Mustang I was faster than [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA27901 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge McDonnell Douglas Phantom FG.1 XT864/007R - No.892 NAS, HMS Ark Royal - November 1978

Although the history of British aviation can boast many famous aeroplanes amongst its ranks, there can be few that were as visually striking as the mighty Phantom FG.1s of the Royal Navy, which operated from the diminutive deck of HMS Ark Royal. In the seconds prior to launch and whilst connected to the ship’s steam catapult, the aircraft’s nose wheel oleo would be extended to its maximum 40 inch position, giving the Phantom a distinct nose up attitude to increase the efficiency of engine thrust. With steam rising eerily from the ships deck, Navy Phantoms looked like a giant metal praying mantis, ready to spring into action at a moment’s notice. With maximum afterburner selected and the engine power almost melting the ship’s deck, the Phantom was finally released from its shackles and roared into the air – such a spectacular experience for anyone lucky enough to see it. Although most of us will have only ever seen the operation of Ark Royal’s Phantoms on video or in reference books, these iconic images left such an indelible impression that Britain’s Rolls Royce Spey powered Phantoms have since become something of an enigma and still command huge enthusiast interest to this day. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA28004 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Messerschmitt Bf 109E-4, 'Yellow 1' 9./JG 26, Caffiers, France, August 1940

The Messerschmitt Bf 109 series of fighter aircraft have to be regarded as some of the most famous aircraft ever to take to the skies. This diminutive and highly capable fighter was in constant production throughout the Second World War, as the basic Messerschmitt airframe proved to be highly adaptable and capable of significant modification. Making its combat debut during the Spanish Civil War, the Bf 109 was one of the first truly modern fighter aircraft, making its first flight before either the Supermarine Spitfire or the Hawker Hurricane - it could be argued that modern monoplane fighter design began with the Messerschmitt Bf 109.

During the Second World War, the Bf 109 earned a fearsome reputation with its adversaries and was synonymous with the ruthless effectiveness of the Wehrmacht, particularly during the early years of the conflict. It was also the mount of many of the worlds most accomplished air ‘aces’ and proved to be one of the most reliable and hard-hitting fighter aircraft ever produced. Significantly, the Messerschmitt Bf 109 was the most heavily produced fighter aircraft in history, with no fewer than 33,984 machines being built – undoubtedly one of the most important aircraft in the history of powered flight.

Already a Luftwaffe fighter ace by the start of the Battle of Britain, Josef ‘Pips’ Priller and the pilots of JG51 would be heavily involved in the fighting against the RAF over the summer of 1940, with many of his comrades falling to the guns of the [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA28005 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Messerschmitt Bf 109E-4 - Wilhelm Bathasar - France, 1940

As the savage aerial fighting above the evacuation beaches of Dunkirk was taking a heavy toll on both sides, the airmen of Britain and Germany knew this was just a pre-curser of a more significant battle to come. Having lost valuable fighters during the Battle of France and Operation Dynamo, the RAF knew that they were facing a battle-hardened enemy, equipped with the most feared fighter aircraft in the world, the agile and heavily armed Messerschmitt Bf 109, which had ruthlessly cleared European skies of all opposition air forces sent against it.

Supremely confident and possessing much greater numbers, the fighter pilots of the Luftwaffe would be at a disadvantage for the first time, fighting against an organised RAF, equipped with excellent fighters of their own and having extremely well trained pilots. The Germans would also be fighting over enemy territory with the English Channel acting as a physical and psychological barrier during combat – if they were shot down, or suffered mechanical difficulties, their chances of getting back to France were now looking much less likely. Despite these new challenges, swarms of Messerschmitts crossed the Channel, determined to break the resolve of the Royal Air Force. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA28103 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Curtiss Tomahawk IIB AK402 P/O Neville Duke, 112 Squadron [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA28601 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Bristol Beaufighter TF.X, RAF No.144 Squadron, Banff, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, October 1944

NEW TOOLING

As one of the most capable twin engine aircraft of WWII, the Bristol Beaufighter was originally developed as a heavy fighter variant of the company’s Beaufort bomber, already in service with the Royal Air Force. The first examples were pressed into service as nightfighters and whilst the aircraft proved to be a significant improvement over existing types, there was more to come from the mighty beau. As the aircraft received successive upgrades to make it more powerful and capable of carrying a greater array of offensive weaponry, the Beaufighter became a successful multi-role aircraft, with a particular flair for mounting hard hitting anti-shipping strikes into the North Sea, preventing Axis shipping from moving supplies back to Germany. It was during one of these missions that Banff based Flying Officer Maurice Exton was awarded a DFC for outstanding flying skill and determination in the face of the enemy. Flying Beaufighter NE829 on 9th October 1944, Exton and his squadron attacked a large convoy of enemy vessels off the coast of Norway, but his aircraft was hit by heavy flak from the ships. Damaging the aircraft’s flight controls, causing it to almost flip onto its back, Exton wrestled with the Beaufighter’s control column, bringing it back straight and level, before immediately pressing home his attack. He then nursed the damaged aircraft back to Banff, where he managed to land safely. Inflicting heavy damage on the enemy convoy they attacked, this [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA28701 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge Fokker E.II, flown by Kurt von Crailsheim, FFA 53, Monthois, France, October 1915

NEW TOOLING

Few airplanes have had such a dramatic impact on the history of aerial warfare as the Fokker Eindecker series of monoplanes, aircraft which are regarded as the first true fighter aircraft in the history of aviation. It was not that these single-wing aircraft were such advanced aeronautical designs, as many of the world’s successful early aircraft were monoplanes (such as the Bleriot XI which crossed the English Channel in 1909), however, they did make use of a particularly sinister innovation. The introduction of interrupter gear synchronised the aircraft’s machine-gun to fire through the arc of the propeller, only allowing it to operate once the blade was clear and crucially, in the pilot’s direct line of sight. For the first time, an aeroplane had been specifically introduced to hunt and destroy other aircraft – the day of the fighter aeroplane had arrived. Despite having a dramatic impact on the Western Front, the Eindecker was still a relatively primitive aircraft and required an immense amount of skill in order to be flown well. This was illustrated by eager young Luftstreitkräfte pilot Baron Kurt von Crailsheim, who on being posted to FFA 53 in the summer of 1915, had his and the unit’s first aerial victory by 22nd September. Just a few days later, he crashed the twitchy Eindecker whilst attempting a landing at Monthois airfield, which resulted in his fighter being written off. He later received a new replacement aircraft, which he once again painted in his [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA32518 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Junkers Ju87B-2, J9+BL, Luftwaffe 9./StG.1, St. Pol, France, November 1940

Describing the Junkers Ju87 Stuka as one of the most famous aircraft of WWII would certainly be accurate, although it could be argued that the word infamous would be more appropriate - the Stuka was without doubt, one of the most terrifying weapons from the early years of the Second World War. Taking a huge toll on Allied shipping, armored vehicles and general military and civilian infrastructure, the Stuka was a close air support and strike attack aircraft, capable of providing precision bombing support to advancing Wehrmacht ground units. Destroying strategically important targets before they could become a problem, these aircraft were feared more than any other weapon during the opening months of the Second World War, with the sight (and sound) of approaching Stukas usually signifying that devastation was heading your way. During the Battle of Britain, the RAF exposed the deficiencies of the Stuka in combat and they took a heavy toll of these much vaunted dive bombers. Losses became so severe that Stuka operations over England were restricted to night raids against coastal targets in the South East during the winter of 1940, with these aircraft being specially prepared for nocturnal operations. With the light blue under-surfaces completely overpainted with a black wash, all national insignia and most unit markings were also blacked out, in an attempt to make the aircraft less vulnerable to night detection by Britain’s defences. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA32820 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge DH Mosquito B.IV DK296 - GB-G Flt. Lt. D A G ‘George’ Parry, RAF No.105 Squadron, Horsham St. Faith, June 1942

As one of the great aircraft of the Second World War, the De Havilland Mosquito can claim to be the world’s first truly effective multi-role aircraft, possessing great speed and being equally adept at performing missions as either a fighter or a bomber. When entering full production, the Mosquito was the fastest aircraft in the world and a closely guarded RAF secret – pilots operating the first Mosquito raids over occupied territory were instructed to burn their aircraft if crash landing safely, to avoid the Mosquito falling into German hands.

Constructed almost entirely of wooden laminate, the aircraft soon came to the attention of the British public, who referred to the Mosquito as the ‘Wooden Wonder’, a bomber that was able to out-run the Luftwaffe. From a German perspective, the Mosquito was arguably the British aircraft they coveted the most and despite attempts to produce their own equivalent, they could never match the impressive performance of the RAF Mosquito. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA33421 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Westland Sea King, HC.4 ZA290, 846 Naval Air Squadron, Falklands, 1982 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA33422 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Sikorski SH-3A Bu.No 152134, HS-3 ‘Tridents’, USS Guadalcanal, July 21st 1966

If the intrepid pioneers of flight inspired the world with their determination to achieve manned, powered flight in the years before the First World War, then a similar fascination was surely held for the men engaged in the US Space Programme during the 1960s and 1970s. Millions of people would be glued to their televisions as mighty rockets blasted men into space, with everyone holding their breath until the astronauts safely returned a few days later and the sight of their protective space capsule splashing down in the ocean. Quickly rescued by specially trained US Navy helicopter crews, it would not be before pictures were broadcast of the returning astronauts waving at the gathered crowds that people would finally relax, knowing that another giant step had been taken towards putting a man on the moon. Assigned as the lead recovery helicopter for the Gemini X mission, handsome Sikorsky SH-3A ‘White 63’ from US Navy HS-3 ‘Tridents’ was on the scene seconds after the capsule splashed down, with its specialist diver ensuring the safe extraction of the returning astronauts. With the world’s attention fixed on this latest mission, for a few short moments, the live broadcast of the recovery made this aircraft the most famous helicopter in the world, before it returned to USS Guadalcanal as America’s latest spaceman transporter. After its time in the limelight, the aircraft would return to its usual anti-submarine patrol duties. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA33617 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Panavia Tornado GR4 ZA461 15XV R Squadron Centenary Scheme 2015 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA33618 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Panavia Tornado GR4 ZA459 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA34113 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Blackburn Buccaneer S2, XW538, 16 Squadron RAF Gutersloh November 1977 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA34214 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Chinook ZA683 27 Squadron - 100 Years of RAF [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA34317 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Focke Wulf FW190 A-8/R2 11 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA36013 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge BAE Hawk XX246 95-Y 100 Squadron - 100 Years of RAF

As 2018 marks the Centenary of the Royal Air Force, we can expect to see many RAF Squadrons commemorating the occasion by presenting one of their aircraft in attractive special markings. This is always popular with aircrew and enthusiasts alike and over the years has resulted in some memorable and extremely photogenic aircraft in the skies of Britain. As one of the oldest Squadrons in the RAF, No.100 Squadron are rightly proud of their heritage and to mark the occasion of their 95th Anniversary in 2012, they presented one of their BAe Hawk T.1 aircraft in a striking Bomber Command scheme.

Avro Lancaster EE139 ‘Phantom of the Ruhr’ represented the Squadron for the first 29 of its operational missions, before going on to amass an impressive tally of 121 total missions during WWII and was used as the inspiration for this Hawk scheme. Applied to the Commanding Officer’s aircraft, Hawk XX246 instantly became one of the most popular aircraft in the Royal Air Force and a fitting tribute to both the history of 100 Squadron and the men and women who have served over the years. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA36015 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge BAe Hawk T1 XX245, The Red Arrows, 2018 display season, RAF 100

As the Royal Air Force prepared to mark their centenary year in some style, there was no doubt that the world famous Red Arrows would have a significant role to play throughout 2018. Coming at the end of an intensive period of winter training, where approximately 150 practice sorties would need to be flown before the team’s display authorisation could be granted, every Airshow event and ceremonial flypast would hope to boast an appearance from the Red Arrows during the RAF’s centenary year. This would see the team undertake a punishing schedule of more than 60 displays, performing to millions of enthralled spectators all over Europe. The honour of leading the team during this historic year fell to Squadron Leader Martin Pert, his first year as ‘Red 1’ and arguably the most prestigious role within the entire Royal Air Force. The famous red BAe Hawk T1 trainers used by the team represent one of the most successful British aircraft of the post war years and have been the mount of the Red Arrows for an impressive 38 display seasons, taking over from the Folland Gnat in 1979, with their first Hawk displays performed the following year. To mark the centenary year of the Royal Air Force, the distinctive Hawks of the Red Arrows benefited from an additional RAF 100 logo above the roundel, identifying the aircraft as those taking part in these historic commemorations. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA36111 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Consolidated Catalina IVA JV928 ‘Y’ - Lt John Alexander Cruickshank VC, 210 Squadron, July 1944 - 100 Years of the RAF

As an Island nation, Britain would rely heavily on the contribution of long ranging maritime patrol aircraft during WWII, particularly the flying boats and brave crews of Coastal Command. Working alongside the mighty Short Sunderland, the American built Consolidated Catalina proved to be one of the most successful aircraft of its type, able to mount patrols which sometimes exceeded eighteen hours in duration and more than capable of destroying any enemy shipping they encountered along the way. During one such patrol on 17th July 1944, Catalina JV928, piloted by Scotsman John Cruickshank, was five hours into a mission west of the Lofoten Islands in the Norwegian Sea, when the crew obtained a radar signal from the sea below. Aware that the Royal Navy were reportedly in the area, the aircraft flew down for a closer look, only to be confronted by German U-boat U361 and its compliment of anti-aircraft guns. Immediately preparing to go on the offensive, Cruickshank executed a perfect attack run, only to see the depth charges to fail to release from the aircraft. Determined to press home their attack and with the weapon issue now resolved, the Catalina was brought in for a second run, this time into a hail of well aimed shells from the U-boat crew now fully aware of the aircrafts destructive intentions. Taking multiple hits to the front of the Catalina and inflicting significant injuries on crew members, the attack resulted in the depth charges deploying at [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA36211 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Gloster Sea Gladiator N5519: G6A, 802 Squadron, HMS Glorious June 1939 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA36408 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Eurofighter Typhoon, FGR.4, ZJ950/C, ‘Charity’ RAF No.29 Squadron, Falklands Defense [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA36409 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Eurofighter Typhoon T3 ZK380 - 100 Years of RAF [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA36614 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge F-5E-2 Lightning 43-28619 ‘Rita/Ruth’, USAAF 27th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, 7th Photographic Group, Eighth Air Force, Mount Farm Airfield, August 1944

One of the most crucial elements of the D-Day air campaign was the gathering of detailed reconnaissance photographs of the entire intended invasion area, which included the assessment of previous bombing raid effectiveness and the identification of future targets. In lessons learned during the disastrous Dieppe raid of 1942, military planners knew they had to have the very latest intelligence information in order to prepare for invasion, disrupting enemy communications and destroying defensive strongholds overlooking the invasion beaches. One of the most effective aircraft in securing this information was the Lockheed F-5E-2 Lightning, the photographic reconnaissance version of the distinctive twin boom P-38J variant. Undergoing modification at squadron level, these aircraft featured enlarged camera windows for more effective information gathering, with this bigger window featuring a teardrop fairing to minimise the impact of addition drag. Lightning 43-28619 was unusual in that it made a feature of this enlarged eye in the sky by the artistic addition of sharks teeth, with the camera windows serving as eyes for the flying beast. Wearing its overall PRU blue colour scheme, nose artwork and D-Day identification markings, this must have been one of the most distinctive aircraft in the skies above the Normandy beaches, even though its mission profile was for the Lightning to remain undetected. On 26th November [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA36712 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Junkers Ju88A-5 9K+ED, Stab III./KG51, Winter 1940

As a result of the RAFs first bombing raid against Berlin on 25th August 1940 and incorrectly assuming that Fighter Command were all but knocked out of the war, the Luftwaffe were directed to leave Britain’s fighter stations alone and concentrate their efforts against London. In a period which became known as the Blitz, from October 1940, British cities were targeted by German bombers on a nightly basis and whilst these raids had a devastating effect on the civilian population, it allowed Britain to galvanise its defences and re-equip its battered fighter squadrons. Arguably the most effective bomber available to the Luftwaffe during WWII was the Junkers Ju88, a pre-war ‘Schnellbomber’ which proved to be both capable and adaptable, seeing service throughout WWII and produced in significant quantities. For the switch to night bombing operations over Britain, most of III./KG51s Ju88s benefited from some field applied camouflage modifications, which helped to make the aircraft less visible to British defences. The under-surfaces of the aircraft were given a black paint wash, which effectively masked all national insignia and fuselage markings were similarly blacked out. Only the top wing balkenkreuz was retained, presumably to aid with friendly unit recognition and to avoid incidents of friendly fire losses. It is interesting to note that of the many KG51 Ju88s lost over Britain during the night Blitz offensive, one machine lost during November 1940 was thought to have been the first victim of a radar equipped Bristol Be [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA36809 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Westland Lysander Mk.IIIA(SD) V9822, RAF No.161 Squadron, Special Operations

With its famed short field landing and take-off performance, the distinctive Westland Lysander was in widespread service at the beginning of the Second World War, performing such duties as Army cooperation, artillery spotting, reconnaissance and light bombing missions. The Battle of France was disastrous for Lysander units, proving the vulnerability of the aircraft and its inability to defend itself against fighter attack, however, despite this, large numbers of Lysanders would have been sent against landing German forces, had their planned invasion of Britain took place the following year. Significantly, the performance of the Lysander made it the ideal aircraft to undertake clandestine nocturnal operations into enemy occupied France and a number of aircraft were specially modified to transport and recover agents and people of interest, working with the Special Operations Executive and the French resistance. Unarmed and using nothing more than maps, compass and the moonlight for navigation, these dangerous missions were flown at low level to avoid detection and landing in fields which were marked by the French resistance. Knowing that the Germans would show them no mercy if they were captured during one of these missions, they helped to provide essential intelligence to Allied military planners in advance of the D-Day landings and required levels of flying skill, bravery and tenacity which were only found in a small number of special airmen. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA36909 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Junkers Ju52/3m D-2600 - ‘Immelmann II’ - Adolf Hitler’s personal transport aircraft - Berlin Tempelhof Airport, circa 1936.

Undoubtedly one of the most distinctive aircraft of the Second World War, the tri-motor Junkers Ju52 can trace its origins back to a first flight in October 1930 and even though it was obsolete at the start of the conflict, it would go on to see extensive use and be produced throughout the war. From the early days of his political career, Adolf Hitler was one of the first major world figures to use aircraft as his preferred mode of transport and on becoming Chancellor of Germany, he began to establish his own private air fleet, which was based at Berlin Tempelhof Airport. Preferring to use the roomy and reliable Junkers Ju52, his aircraft were named after famous German airmen of the Great War, such as Immelmann, Richthofen and Boelcke, with his personal pilot Hans Baur overseeing the internal fittings of the aircraft to ensure Hitler’s comfort. Ju52 3/m D-2600 ‘Immelmann II’ was one of the famous aircraft operated as a Fuhrermaschine, usually serving as the lead aircraft (and Hitler’s preferred aircraft) but backed up by several other Ju52s to ensure constant availability. The aircraft were also available for use by other high ranking officials and in order to ensure Hitler’s safety, a number of aircraft were often operated at the same time, to minimise the risk of attack. At the insistence of Hans Baur, Hitler upgraded his main transport aircraft to the new four engined Focke Wulf Fw 200 Condor in 1939, however, he retained links to his trusty [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA37209 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Handley Page Halifax B.III LV937/MH-E ‘Expensive Babe’, RAF No.51 Squadron, Snaith, March 1945 – Halifax Centurion

One of the most significant factors in reducing the effectiveness of Luftwaffe bombing operations during the Second World War was their lack of a capable heavy bomber which could be deployed in large numbers. By comparison, the Allies were almost spoilt for choice and following the introduction of the four engined Short Stirling, Bomber Command’s operations took on a new dimension of offensive capability. The second four engined ‘Heavy’ to enter squadron service was the Handley Page Halifax, an aircraft which would go on to see constant development throughout the rest of the war and result in more than 6,000 aircraft eventually being produced. Underlining the incredibly dangerous missions these mighty aircraft were designed to undertake, out of this number, only five Halifax’s would manage to set the impressive mark of completing 100 or more operational sorties and taking their place in the annals of Bomber Command history. Handley Page Halifax B.III LV937 ‘Expensive Babe’ was one of those five aircraft – entering RAF service with No.578 Squadron in March 1944, she only served one month with this unit, before being transferred to No.51 Squadron at Snaith the following month. She would see extensive service with this squadron over the next few months, recording her landmark 100th operation on 25th March 1945, on a raid to Osnabrück. Highlighting the international contribution to Bomber Command during WWII, the crew on this significant date was made up of A [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA37610 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Westland Wessex HC.2 XV721, 72 Squadron RAF

The Westland Wessex was a turbine-powered helicopter which was a development of the American Sikorsky S58. It was picked up by the RAF from the Royal Navy in the early sixties when they required a general-purpose helicopter capable of carrying troops, conducting ground attacks and acting as an air ambulance. In 1969, two Wessexes were ordered with specific modifications in mind, with the aim of VIP use, specifically with The Queen’s Flight. Prince Charles, Princess Anne and The Queen Mother were regular passengers, with Prince Philip even piloting the aircraft over the years. It wasn’t until August 1977 that Queen Elizabeth herself finally took her seat on board and took to the skies. Now housed in the RAF museum in Hendon, it continues to draw a crowd. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA37611 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Westland Wessex HC.2 XR500/A - RAF No.78 Squadron, Sharjah, Trucial States, 1970

The Westland Wessex HC.2 was a licence built turbine powered development of the classic American Sikorski S-58 Helicopter, one of the world’s first truly capable helicopters and one which finally established these aircraft as amongst the most useful for both military and civilian applications. XR500 was one of a batch or 4 HC.2 helicopters delivered in advance of the type’s acceptance into RAF service and was used by the Wessex Intensive Flying Trials Unit at RAF Odiham, in preparation for its squadron introduction. It was later one of the founding aircraft of the re-forming No.18 Squadron, the first operational unit to receive the Wessex HC.2, in January 1964. It would later join No.78 Squadron and from 1967, operate from the vital overseas base at Sharjah in the Trucial States (now part of the United Arab Emirates) where, in conjunction with other RAF units, it would help to ensure the ongoing stability of the region. Wearing this particularly attractive scheme, these hard working helicopters would transport troops and supplies around the region, whilst also being on hand to provide flexible airborne support whenever called upon. XR500 was written off in April 1979 when it crashed into Hong Kong harbour, whilst undertaking a winching exercise in poor weather – thankfully, the crew all survived the experience. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA37702 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge RAF Se5a - Capt W.A. Billy Bishop, Royal Flying Corps, No60 Squadron, Summer 1917
From the Aviation Archive - New Casting
Aviation Archive represents a myriad of detailed die-cast models designed for the true enthusiast, depicting both military models from famous battles and sky warfare over the last 100 years, and civil aircraft, which have frequented the flight paths of countries worldwide.

The Royal Flying Corps top-scoring WWI ace was Billy Bishop, a Canadian who scored 72 victories. Awarded the Victoria Cross, he was the first pilot to surpass the record of British ace Albert Ball. McCudden, Ball, Bishop, Mannock and many other British aces found the S.E.5a was, at last, the aircraft they could fight on equal terms with against the German Albatros. Soon after they were delivered, Lieutenant A.P.F. Rhys Davids, flying with No. 5 Squadron, brought down Werner Voss, von Richthofen’s famous number two. Although just a single victory, it was an enormous boost to Allied morale and an early scalp for the S.E.5a, which, despite its rugged, almost over-simple appearance, was destined to become one of the most successful British aircraft of WWI. [Age: 14 and up ] [Inches: 7 wingspan ]

CORGI - AA37708 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge RAF SE5A 56 Squadron RFC 1917 - 100 Years of RAF [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA37808 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge Albatros D.V a , D.7327/17, Lt. Lothar Weiland, Jasta 5 , Seefrontstaffel 1, July 1918 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA37809 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge Albatros DV 2059/17, Manfred von Richthofen, JG1, Marckebeke, Late August 1917

As the most famous fighter pilot in the history of military aviation, the name Manfred von Richthofen is familiar to many people and despite the Great War claiming his life more than 100 years ago, the exploits of the Bloody Red Baron continue to be a source of fascination to this day. Originally joining the Luftstreitkräfte as an aerial observer, his fighting ambitions would lead von Richthofen to be selected for fighter training, where he would later become a legend of the air, being credited with more aerial victories than any other pilot of the Great War. He is inextricably linked with the red Fokker Triplane fighter in which he scored his final victories and indeed met his death, however, it would be the famous Albatros series of fighters which would bring him the majority of his victories. During April 1917, in a period referred to by Allied airmen as ‘Bloody April’, von Richthofen and his fellow Luftstreitkräfte pilots would take a heavy toll of British aircraft, with his personal tally standing at an impressive 21 victories. Von Richthofen sustained a significant head wound which almost cost his life whilst engaged in combat with the RFC on 6th July 1917 and although it is reported he was never quite the same person following recuperation and his return to duty, he would go on to score a further 23 victories. One of the aircraft used after his return to combat and before converting to the Fokker Triplane was Albatros DV 2059/17, which he used to claim his 58th and 59th victories. As [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA37908 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge SPAD XIII S7000 - Rene Fonck - Escadrille 103,1918.

Although history has dictated that the aerial combat prowess of Manfred von Richthofen ensured he became one of the world’s most famous aviation personalities, the same cannot be said of the leading Allied ‘Ace of Aces’ from the Great War, who has remained largely anonymous to all but the most committed of enthusiasts. Rene Fonck originally shunned the opportunity to become a pilot, preferring instead to share the trenches with his countrymen, as they fought against the Germans. The horrors of war soon changed his mind and led him to the cockpit of an aeroplane, where he was to display a real aptitude for flying and would eventually see him posted to a French Air Force reconnaissance squadron. His impressive airmanship and determination to fight brought about a transfer to the elite Escadrille 103 and the beginning of a long association with the SPAD fighter, an aircraft in which he would quickly begin to score victories. The consummate tactician, Fonck would study the actions of his enemy during combat, watching from a safe distance before decisively launching his attack. Using as little ammunition as possible and perfecting the art of deflection shooting, Fonck would boast that he could direct his bullets so precisely into an enemy aircraft that it was as if he had placed them there by hand. By the end of the war, Fonck had been credited with 75 aerial victories, although his actual total is thought to have been much higher, possibly as many as 100 and even eclipsing the great Red Baron. As it was, his official sco [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA38108 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge Sopwith Camel F1, B6313, Major William George ‘Billy’ Barker C/O , No.139 Sqn, Italy 1918 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA38109 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge Sopwith F.1 Camel B6401 No.3 Squadron RNAS - Northern France, 1918

Canadian ace Lloyd Samuel Breadner can surely claim to have flown one of the most distinctive Sopwith Camels on the Western Front. Featuring two large circles on the top wing, his aircraft also included King of Diamonds playing cards on the top of the lower wings, the badge of the Canadian Expeditionary Force carried behind the cockpit and a striking red and white ‘rising sun’ on the tail and elevators - there can be no doubting that Flight Lieutenant Breadner wanted his German opponents to see him coming.

Joining No.3 Squadron RNAS in 1917, Breadner initially flew the Sopwith Pup scout, in which he managed to score seven aerial victories, one of which was a mighty German Gotha bomber on 23rd April 1917, the first time a British fighter had brought down one of these behemoth’s over the Western Front.

When his unit converted to the new Sopwith Camel, he went on to score a further three victories during September 1917, all of which were against Luftstreitkrafte Albatros D.V fighters. Surviving the war, Breadner became Air Officer Commanding-in Chief RCAF Overseas during WWII and on his retirement, was promoted to Air Chief Marshal – the first Canadian to hold this rank. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA38208 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Douglas Dakota C-47, 'Kwicherbichen', BBMF [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA38209 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Douglas C-47A Skytrain - Berlin Airlift [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA38306 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge Fokker Dr.I Triplane, 213/17 ‘K’, Lt. Friederich Kempf, Jasta 2, Pronville Aerodrome, 1917

The pace of aviation development throughout the First World War was nothing short of astonishing and saw the aeroplane become a critical component of any future military planning. Initially required to allow accurate observation of enemy positions and troop movements, it quickly became apparent that denying the enemy the ability to obtain this type of reconnaissance information would be vital and the first aerial duels began to take place. Early exchanges were nothing more than pilots shooting at their adversaries using their service revolvers, but specially designed fighter aircraft soon began to appear, determined to gain superiority of the air. Perhaps the most famous German fighter of the First World War was the Fokker Dr.1 Triplane, or Dreidecker, which was produced to counter the British Sopwith Triplane introduced so successfully during the Battle of Arras in April 1917. Produced in relatively small numbers, the DR.1 was operated by elite units and in the hands of such ace pilots as Manfred von Richthofen, earned the aircraft a fearsome reputation. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA38307 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge Fokker DR. 1 Dreidekker [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA38308 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge Fokker DR. 1 Manfred Von Richofen - Red Baron [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA38409 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Bristol Blenheim Mk.IV R3843/WV-F, ‘Operation Leg’ August 1941

At a time when Britain and her Commonwealth were enduring their ‘Darkest Hour’, the nation were in need of inspirational heroes and perhaps nobody answered this call more famously than Douglas Bader. Losing both his legs as a result of a pre-war flying accident, Bader’s determination to re-join the RAF saw him playing a significant role in leading Fighter Command’s defiant resistance against the Luftwaffe during the Battle of Britain and later taking part in fighter sweeps over Northern France, as the RAF went on the offensive. It was during one of these operations on 9th August 1941 that Bader’s Spitfire collided with another aircraft, severing the tail and sending him spinning towards the ground. Although managing to exit the aircraft and parachute to safety, one of his prosthetic legs had remained stuck in the cockpit and crashed to earth with the stricken Spitfire. Clearly a huge propaganda coup for the Germans, they contacted the RAF with news of Bader’s capture and to offer safe passage to an aircraft bringing a replacement leg for their illustrious guest. Not wanting to allow the Germans an even greater propaganda victory, the RAF planned to parachute drop a new leg, not by accepting the safe passage option, but as part of a full ‘Circus’ bombing raid. On 19th August 1941, six Blenheim Mk.IVs supported by a large force of Spitfires launched an attack against the power station at Gosnay, with Blenheim R3843 also carrying a rather unusual payload, Douglas Bader’s new leg. The wooden box containing the [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA38508 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Messerschmitt Bf 110E, Stab II./NJG 1, Deelen, Holland, Spring 1942

The Battle of Britain had proved to be a chastening experience for the Messerschmitt Bf110 heavy fighter units of the Luftwaffe, but despite their disappointing performance against the fighters of the RAF, Messerschmitt’s fighting twin would go on to perform effectively in other theatres. Seeing extensive service on the Eastern Front, North Africa and the Mediterranean, the extra range and firepower possessed by the Bf 110 helped it to live up to its pre-war reputation, especially when not facing effective fighter opposition. It would however, be night operations against RAF Bomber Command which proved to be the aircraft’s most suited operating environment, especially when equipped with the latest air interception radar equipment available to the Luftwaffe. With many of the world’s most successful nightfighter aces perfecting their skills whilst flying the Bf 110, this would become an important aircraft in the nocturnal struggle against the hundreds of RAF bombers crossing the coast of Northern Europe each night. This sinister looking all-black Nachtjagdgeschwader 1 Messerschmitt Bf110E is equipped with the early FuG 202 Lichtenstein B/C air interception radar, which was introduced during 1942 and featured the complex ‘Matratze’ aerial antenna array on the nose of the aircraft. The radar operator in the rear cockpit would use a pair of oscilloscopes to help him direct his pilot to a possible interception. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA38707 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Supermarine Spitfire XIV RM740 - RAF No.322 (Dutch) Squadron, Deanland - August 1944.

The aviation pedigree of the Supermarine Spitfire is second to none. Produced in greater numbers than any other British aircraft, the Spitfire was in constant production throughout the Second World War, with the basic airframe capable of readily accepting upgrades and improvements which maintained the aircraft’s position as one of the most capable single engined fighting aeroplanes of WWII. The combination of the classic Spitfire airframe and the new powerful Rolls Royce Griffon engine produced a ‘Super Spitfire’ and what was regarded by many aviation historians as the finest low altitude interceptor available to Allied air forces during WWII. Having contributed to offensive operations in support of the D-Day landings, the speedy Spitfire Mk. XIVs of RAF No.322 Squadron were given a dangerous new task in the weeks which followed, intercepting the indiscriminate V1 ‘Doodlebug’ flying bombs which were hurled against Southern Britain from their launch sites in France, in the weeks following the successful Allied landings in Normandy. The squadron proved extremely proficient in these ‘Anti-diver’ sorties, with no fewer than 108.5 Doodlebugs falling to the guns of their mighty Griffon powered Spitfires, before advancing Allied ground units could overrun the launch sites, thus taking these terrifying weapons out of range of their intended target areas. Released from their Doodlebug duties, the Griffon Spitfires of No.322 squadron were sent to operate from recently liberated bases in Europe [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA38906 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge Fokker D.VII (OAW) 4649/18 "Seven Swabians" Wilhelm Scheutzel, Jasta 65, September 1918

Although the air war had turned inexorably in favour of the Allies by the late summer of 1918, the Luftstreitkrafte were still able to introduce an aircraft which is generally considered to be the finest fighter of the Great War, the Fokker D.VII. German pilots had a saying that this new fighter could make a mediocre pilot good and a good pilot into an ace, but unfortunately this was to prove a case of too little, too late.

Fokker D.VII 4649/18 has to be considered one of the most flamboyantly decorated fighters of the Great War – adorning both sides of the aircraft’s fuselage, an elaborate scene featuring the ‘Seven Swabians’ from a famous Brothers Grimm German Fairy Tale must have made for an unusual sight. Brandishing an oversized spear which required all seven of the Swabians to carry, the story tells the farcical tale of this hapless group and their futile attempts to achieve greatness through performing great deeds.

Showing an incredible level of artistic talent, the artwork was slightly different on both sides of the aircraft, however, despite all this decorative effort, this particular fighter was to achieve no more than two aerial victories during its short service career. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA39807 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Panavia Tornado F.3 ZG797/D ‘Desperation’ RAF No.29 Squadron, Falklands Defense [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - CC03502 - 1/45 Scale Click to Enlarge Chitty Chitty Bang Bang Flying Car

2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the wonderful musical adventure that is “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.” The movie is loosely based on the 1964 novel by Ian Fleming with the screen adaptation written by iconic children’s author Roald Dahl and directed by Ken Hughes.

To mark this anniversary, we’re proud to re-introduce the iconic 1:45 scale car back into the Corgi range. The wings are moveable and the car will contain all four characters from the original November 1968 release, Dick Van Dyke’s character Caractacus Potts, Adrian Hall’s Jeremy Potts, Heather Ripley’s Jemima Potts and Sally Ann Howes’ Truly Scrumptious! [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - CC04311 - 1/36 Scale Click to Enlarge James Bond - Aston Martin DB5 - GoldenEye 1995 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - CC04312 - 1/43 Scale Aston Martin DB5 - James Bond - Geneva Launch Special Edition

The rich heritage shared between Aston Martin and James Bond reached its zenith with the legendary DB5 in ‘Goldfinger’ (1964) thanks to an iconic action sequence that saw Bond (Sean Connery) evade his pursuers with the aid of gadgets and armaments installed in the vehicle by Q Branch. In August 2018, Aston Martin and EON Productions announced a unique collaboration that will see the manufacturer produce 25 brand new Aston Martin DB5 ‘Goldfinger’ continuation cars for sale, featuring functioning gadgets as seen onscreen in the classic film. If you are not able to obtain one of these highly desirable vehicles, Corgi is proud to present possibly the next best thing – a brand new release of the die-cast 1:36 scale Aston Martin DB5 that features deployable battering rams, machine guns, and a rear bullet shield, along with a working passenger ejector seat. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - CC04804 - 1/36 Scale Click to Enlarge James Bond - Aston Martin Vantage - The Living Daylights (1987) [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - CC05401 Click to Enlarge Beatles Yellow Submarine

To mark the 50th anniversary of the release of The Beatles’ iconic film, Yellow Submarine (1968), we are re-releasing our fun-filled Corgi Yellow Submarine model.

Originally released in 1969 the model will include moveable hatches to reveal four original Beatles figures as well as a rotating periscope which moves as the model is pushed along. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - CC07103 - 1/36 Scale Click to Enlarge James Bond - AMC Hornet - The Man With The Golden Gun (1974) [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - CC08001 - 1/36 Scale Click to Enlarge James Bond - Aston Martin DB10 - Spectre (2015) [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - CC42418 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge The Beatles - Magical Mystery Tour Bus

The Beatles released the “Magical Mystery Tour” album in 1967 to accompany the film of the same name which was first shown in the UK on Boxing Day.

The record proved a huge success, it had multiple weeks at number one in the charts in multiple countries and was nominated for “Album of the Year” at the 1968 Grammy Awards.

The re-release of this replica of the Bedford VAL used in the film is meticulously detailed and will appeal to both die-cast and Beatles collectors alike. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - CC51031 - 1/50 Scale Click to Enlarge Sherman M4 A3 – US Army, Luxembourg 1944

One of the most famous military vehicles of the Second World War, the M4 Sherman was an American built medium tank used by many of the Western Allies and produced in huge quantities. With the prototype M4 only being available in September 1941, it is incredible to think that these tanks would flood the battlefields of Western Europe, North Africa and the Pacific in the months to come, with almost 50,000 examples being built by the end of July 1945. The Sherman was first used in combat by the British Army at the Second Battle of El Alamein, where it would face German armor for the very first time. One interesting feature of the Sherman’s design was that each tank manufactured in the US would have to be shipped around the world and therefore included four lifting rings, one at each corner of the tank. This also had an impact on the tanks weight, as dockside cranes around the world would have to be strong enough to lift them. Large numbers of Sherman Tanks would be used during the invasion of Normandy and in the months following the breakout from the D-Day beachheads, including a small number of tanks specially modified to be amphibious.

This surviving M4 A3 Sherman took part in the 1944 Battle of the Bulge in the Belgium and Luxembourg Ardennes. Outnumbered American troops put up fierce resistance in defending places like Clervaux and attacking German units of the 5th Panzer Army were unable to take the key road intersections required for a rapid advance towards Antwerp. The tank still stands near its original position at C [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - CC60013 - 1/50 Scale Click to Enlarge Sdkfz 7 Artillery Tractor – Tunisia 1943

This heavy half-track was one of the powerful vehicles which pulled Germany’s supplies and artillery around the battlefields of the Second World War and was used throughout the war, on all fronts where German troops were engaged. The vehicle is perhaps best known as the tractor unit for the fearsome 88mm anti-tank/anti-aircraft gun, although it also served in a number of other essential roles, such as tank recovery. Providing a mobile solution to anti-aircraft defence, the Krauss-Maffei could also be equipped with a quad 2cm Flakvierling 38L artillery piece, mounted on the modified load platform of the vehicle.

On May 7th 1943, the British 7th Armored Division captured Tunis, the capital of Tunisia and the USII Army Corps captured Bizerte, the last remaining port in Axis hands. Six days later on May 13, 1943, the Axis forces in North Africa surrendered and 267,000 German and Italian soldiers became prisoners of war. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - CC60112 - 1/50 Scale Click to Enlarge Churchill MkIII – 6th Scots Guards Brigade 1943

The British Churchill infantry tank may have been slightly cumbersome in appearance but was certainly one of the best Allied tanks of WWII. Championed by Winston Churchill, who insisted on the production of a new infantry support tank capable of crossing shell holes and trenches on the battlefield, the Churchill proved to be reliable and resilient, with thick frontal armor which made it impervious to all but the most powerful German guns. First used during the disastrous Dieppe Raid of 1942, the Churchill would go on to see action in North Africa, Italy and the Far East, before playing a significant role in the Normandy Invasion. A rugged and flexible design, the Churchill was used as the basis for some specialist vehicles to overcome the strong German fortifications of the Atlantic Wall, such as the AVRE (Armored Vehicle Royal Engineers), a tank featuring a 290mm mortar, which fired a short range charge designed to obliterate concrete bunkers. In addition to this, the Churchill Crocodile was a heavy mobile flame thrower, which was probably feared more than any other Allied vehicle by defending German troops.

Ahead of the invasion of Normandy that began on D Day, 6th June 1944, the 6th Scots Guards Tank Brigade was formed in England and included the 3rd (Tank) Battalion Scots Guards, equipped with Churchill tanks. In July 1944 they landed in France and would serve from then on mostly attached to the 15th (Scottish) Division. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - CC60215 - 1/50 Scale Click to Enlarge Panther Tank – Panzerkampfwagen V Panther Ausf D, Unknown Unit, Northern Bavaria, April 1945, Defense of the Reich

Widely regarded as the finest German tank of the Second World War, the PzKpfw V Panther was a formidable combination of speed, manoeuvrability, armor protection and firepower, making this a feared battlefield adversary. Built in response to combat experiences on the Eastern Front and the impressive performance of the latest Soviet tanks, Russia would also see the combat introduction of the new Panther, during the battle of Kursk in the summer 1943. Although classed by the German’s as a medium tank, the Panther weighed in at an impressive 45 tons, but proved to be significantly more mobile than its size suggests and after overcoming initial service introduction issues, the Panther began to show its destructive potential. One criticism of the larger German tank designs was that they tended to be over-engineered and whilst they were undoubtedly impressive fighting machines, there simply were not enough of them with front line units. By the time of D-Day, the Panther was fighting a losing battle and if superior numbers of Allied tanks didn’t get them, rocket firing Hawker Typhoons undoubtedly would. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - CC60309 - 1/50 Scale Click to Enlarge Bedford QLD – RAF 2nd Tactical Airforce, 84 Group, Normandy June 1944 (D Day)

With well over 50,000 units produced, the Bedford QL series of 3 ton 4x4 utility trucks were some of the most heavily produced British vehicles of the Second World War and were required to fulfil a wide variety of essential communications and supply roles. The ability to move, supply and equip military forces is critical to the success of any campaign and by their nature, vehicles used to support this must be reliable, flexible and available in great numbers. The Bedford QL satisfied all of these needs and whether it was pulling a Bofors anti- aircraft gun or serving as a signals vehicle, it proved to be the backbone of the British Army.

The RAF 2nd Tactical Airforce (2TAF) was formed on 1st June 1943 as HQ Tactical Air Force from Army Co-operation Command in connection with preparations to train to invade Europe a year later. It took units from both Fighter Command and Bomber Command in order to form a force capable of supporting the Army in the field. Bomber Command provided light bombers, Fighter Command was split into the Air Defence of Britain retaining fighter units for home defence, and No.83 Group and No.84 group operating aircraft, and No.85 Group controlling ground based units. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - CC60418 - 1/50 Scale Click to Enlarge M3 A1 Half-Track 41st Armored Infantry, 2nd Armored Division, Normandy 1944 (D Day)

Manufactured by the White Motor Company of Cleveland, Ohio, the M3 Half Track was a robust armored personnel carrier which saw extensive service during the Second World War and into the post war years. US military planners knew that it was critical for infantry units to support their advancing tanks, both the protect them from enemy infantry attack and to secure any territorial gains made. Introduced in 1941, the reliable M3 could carry 12 fully equipped troops at speeds approaching 45mph, whilst providing protection from small arms fire. It was said that wherever American troops went, so did their trusty M3 Half Tracks.

The M3 A1 Half Track was an armored vehicle used by the United States, the British Empire and other Allies during WWII. Nearly 43,000 were produced and supplied to the US Army and Marines, as well as British Commonwealth and Soviet Red Army forces, serving on all fronts throughout the war. Between the world wars, the US Army sought to improve the tactical mobility of its forces – with the goal of finding a high-mobility infantry vehicle, the M3 was developed. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - CC60513 - 1/50 Scale Click to Enlarge Tiger I – German Army SpzAbt 502, Russia 1942

Even though the Panzerkamfwagen VI Tiger heavy tank was only used in relatively small numbers during WWII, its fearsome reputation and sinister appearance ensured it is regarded as the most famous tank of the Second World War. Another tank developed as a result of Wehrmacht experiences on the Eastern Front, the Tiger may not have shared the cultured appearance of the Panther, but this was a war machine pure and simple and one which was devastatingly effective on the battlefield. Heavily armored and equipped with the powerful 88mm gun, the sighting optics on the Tiger were so effective that enemy tanks could be destroyed at great distances and well before they were in range to return fire. By the time of the D-Day landings, the reputation of the Tiger was already assured, but even though they managed to inflict heavy losses on Allied armored units, their small numbers were swamped by an overwhelming tide of Allied armored numerical superiority. Unable to control the battlefield, damaged and unserviceable Tigers were simply abandoned to be captured by advancing Allied troops.

Spz.Abt.502 Heavy Tank Battalion is distinguished by the fact that it was the first to deploy the new Tiger 1 in combat. Formed in August 1942, the battalion arrived at the Leningrad front and soon began to use its Tigers in battle. The turret carries the unit’s famous mammoth insignia. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - CC60613 - 1/50 Scale Click to Enlarge Cromwell IV – 2nd Armored Welsh Guards, 1944

A late war British tank design, the Cromwell came at the end of a line of successful cruiser tanks built for speed and mobility. The Cromwell had an unusually long development period for a wartime tank and even though the project began in 1942, the first machines did not enter combat until the D-Day landings. Although the Cromwell was no match for the firepower of the German Tigers and Panthers, it was designed to support rapidly advancing infantry units, allowing them to make strategic gains through the speed of their advance. An extremely fast tank, the Cromwell could reach speeds of 40mph, although this would not have been a pleasant experience for its five man crew, so it was usually limited to speeds no greater than 32mph. Powered by the excellent 600 hp Rolls Royce Meteor engine, this was actually a development of the famous Merlin engine which powered the Spitfires and Hurricanes of the Battle of Britain. Around 4,000 of these tanks were built and they saw heavy use during the battles following the D-Day landings.

This Cromwell IV, named ‘Blenheim’ was photographed during an inspection of the Guards Armored Division by Prime Minister Churchill prior to D-Day. The squadron sign for an un-brigaded regiment with a letter A is shown, identifying the squadron commander along with the bridge classification marking, AoS sign and the Guards formation badge. Later the names and recognition markings were removed and replaced by the Allied Star. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - CC99304 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge North American Mustang P-51
This accurately detailed die-cast model features authentic WWII livery based on real fighters. Includes display stand
[Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - CC99724 - 1/100 Scale Click to Enlarge Hogwarts Express - Harry Potter

Have you received your letter to attend Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry this year? If so, make sure you are ready on Platform 9 3/4s at King’s Cross Railway Station on September 1 at precisely 11 o’clock in the morning, as that’s when the iconic Hogwarts Express departs for the first day of term! Drawn by a distinctive red locomotive, the train was the site of several first meetings with the friends (and enemies) who would play such an important role in Harry Potter’s future adventures. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - CC99725 - 1/43 Scale Click to Enlarge Mr. Weasley's Enchanted 1959 Ford Anglia - Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

Missed the Hogwarts Express and you aren’t old enough to legally apparate to school yet? This disastrous scenario befell Harry Potter and Ron Weasley at the very start of their second year at Hogwarts, but thankfully the pair were able to ‘borrow’ Mr Weasley’s enchanted Ford Anglia. Bestowed with the ability of flight, as well a personality of its own, Harry and Ron’s trip in the car came to a sudden end when they accidentally crash landed into the Whomping Willow in the Hogwarts grounds. Annoyed at this mistreatment, the Anglia disappeared into the Forbidden Forest - much to the despair of Ron’s parents. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - CC99726 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Knight Bus - Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

Lost far from home or need to escape an approaching moment of great peril? Thankfully, the Knight Bus is available for Wizards in need. Coming to Harry Potter’s rescue before he began his third year at Hogwarts, the distinctive triple decker bus is magically enchanted to speed through the streets, squeeze through any gap, and brake in an instant, enabling it to reach any destination (except those underwater). While Harry is a passenger, the three levels of the bus are furnished with beds for an overnight stay on long trips, as well as a chandelier to bring a touch of class to the interior. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - CH006 Click to Enlarge Fire Department - Off Road Truck - Corgi Chunkies Series

Corgi Chunkies is a completely new series of fantastic toys with moving interactive parts, free-rolling, soft-tired wheels, and a strong child-proof build. [Age: 3 and up ]

CORGI - CH007 Click to Enlarge Police - Off Road Truck - Corgi Chunkies Series

Corgi Chunkies is a completely new series of fantastic toys with moving interactive parts, free-rolling, soft-tired wheels, and a strong child-proof build. [Age: 3 and up ]

CORGI - CH008 Click to Enlarge Military Off Road Truck - Corgi Chunkies Series

Corgi Chunkies is a completely new series of fantastic toys with moving interactive parts, free-rolling, soft-tired wheels, and a strong child-proof build. [Age: 3 and up ]

CORGI - CH010 Click to Enlarge Safari Tours - Off Road Truck - Corgi Chunkies Series

Corgi Chunkies is a completely new series of fantastic toys with moving interactive parts, free-rolling, soft-tired wheels, and a strong child-proof build. [Age: 3 and up ]

CORGI - CH031 Click to Enlarge Fire Department Ladder Truck - Corgi Chunkies Series

Corgi Chunkies is a completely new series of fantastic toys with moving interactive parts, free-rolling, soft-tired wheels, and a strong child-proof build. [Age: 3 and up ]

CORGI - CH032 Click to Enlarge Fire Department Bucket Truck - Corgi Chunkies Series

Corgi Chunkies is a completely new series of fantastic toys with moving interactive parts, free-rolling, soft-tired wheels, and a strong child-proof build. [Age: 3 and up ]

CORGI - CH040 Click to Enlarge Road Roller in Orange - Corgi Chunkies Series

Corgi Chunkies is a completely new series of fantastic toys with moving interactive parts, free-rolling, soft-tired wheels, and a strong child-proof build. [Age: 3 and up ]

CORGI - CH041 Click to Enlarge Farm Tractor with Loader - Corgi Chunkies Series

Corgi Chunkies is a completely new series of fantastic toys with moving interactive parts, free-rolling, soft-tired wheels, and a strong child-proof build. [Age: 3 and up ]

CORGI - CH049 Click to Enlarge Mobile Crane - Corgi Chunkies Series

Corgi Chunkies is a completely new series of fantastic toys with moving interactive parts, free-rolling, soft-tired wheels, and a strong child-proof build. [Age: 3 and up ]

CORGI - CH050 Click to Enlarge Off Road Dump Truck in Yellow - Corgi Chunkies Series

Corgi Chunkies is a completely new series of fantastic toys with moving interactive parts, free-rolling, soft-tired wheels, and a strong child-proof build. [Age: 3 and up ]

CORGI - CH065 Click to Enlarge Tow Truck - Corgi Chunkies Series

Corgi Chunkies is a completely new series of fantastic toys with moving interactive parts, free-rolling, soft-tired wheels, and a strong child-proof build. [Age: 3 and up ]

CORGI - CH071 Click to Enlarge Dump Truck - Corgi Chunkies Series

Corgi Chunkies is a completely new series of fantastic toys with moving interactive parts, free-rolling, soft-tired wheels, and a strong child-proof build. [Age: 3 and up ]

CORGI - CH072 Click to Enlarge Snow Plow - Corgi Chunkies Series

Corgi Chunkies is a completely new series of fantastic toys with moving interactive parts, free-rolling, soft-tired wheels, and a strong child-proof build. [Age: 3 and up ]

CORGI - CH073 Click to Enlarge Double-Decker London Tour Bus - Corgi Chunkies Series

Corgi Chunkies is a completely new series of fantastic toys with moving interactive parts, free-rolling, soft-tired wheels, and a strong child-proof build. [Age: 3 and up ]

CORGI - CS90617 Click to Enlarge Avro Vulcan - Corgi Showcase Series

Corgi Showcase is a series of top quality die-cast model aircraft suitable for children aged five and over. Each model comes with a display stand. This series is ideal for the young aviation fan and offers a wide range of models to collect including biplanes, fighters, bombers and modern jets. [Age: 5 and up ]

CORGI - CS90618 Click to Enlarge Supermarine Spitfire - Corgi Showcase Series

Corgi Showcase is a series of top quality die-cast model aircraft suitable for children aged five and over. Each model comes with a display stand. This series is ideal for the young aviation fan and offers a wide range of models to collect including biplanes, fighters, bombers and modern jets. [Age: 5 and up ]

CORGI - CS90619 Click to Enlarge Avro Lancaster - Corgi Showcase Series

Corgi Showcase is a series of top quality die-cast model aircraft suitable for children aged five and over. Each model comes with a display stand. This series is ideal for the young aviation fan and offers a wide range of models to collect including biplanes, fighters, bombers and modern jets. [Age: 5 and up ]

CORGI - CS90620 Click to Enlarge Hawker Hurricane - Corgi Showcase Series

Corgi Showcase is a series of top quality die-cast model aircraft suitable for children aged five and over. Each model comes with a display stand. This series is ideal for the young aviation fan and offers a wide range of models to collect including biplanes, fighters, bombers and modern jets. [Age: 5 and up ]

CORGI - CS90623 Click to Enlarge AH-64 Apache Attack Helicopter - Corgi Showcase Series

Corgi Showcase is a series of top quality die-cast model aircraft suitable for children aged five and over. Each model comes with a display stand. This series is ideal for the young aviation fan and offers a wide range of models to collect including biplanes, fighters, bombers and modern jets. [Age: 5 and up ]

CORGI - CS90624 Click to Enlarge Tornado GR4 - Corgi Showcase Series

Corgi Showcase is a series of top quality die-cast model aircraft suitable for children aged five and over. Each model comes with a display stand. This series is ideal for the young aviation fan and offers a wide range of models to collect including biplanes, fighters, bombers and modern jets. [Age: 5 and up ]

CORGI - CS90625 Click to Enlarge Westland Sea King Search and Rescue Helicopter - Corgi Showcase Series

Corgi Showcase is a series of top quality die-cast model aircraft suitable for children aged five and over. Each model comes with a display stand. This series is ideal for the young aviation fan and offers a wide range of models to collect including biplanes, fighters, bombers and modern jets. [Age: 5 and up ]

CORGI - CS90626 Click to Enlarge Vickers VC10 - Corgi Showcase Series

Corgi Showcase is a series of top quality die-cast model aircraft suitable for children aged five and over. Each model comes with a display stand. This series is ideal for the young aviation fan and offers a wide range of models to collect including biplanes, fighters, bombers and modern jets. [Age: 5 and up ]

CORGI - CS90627 Click to Enlarge North American P-51 Mustang - Corgi Showcase Series

Corgi Showcase is a series of top quality die-cast model aircraft suitable for children aged five and over. Each model comes with a display stand. This series is ideal for the young aviation fan and offers a wide range of models to collect including biplanes, fighters, bombers and modern jets. [Age: 5 and up ]

CORGI - CS90629 Click to Enlarge F-35 Lightning - Corgi Showcase Series

14 years after development first started in the USA the first flight of an F-35A took place in December 2006 . The F-35 was developed with the intention to replace the majority of US fighter jets with three variants (A, B and C) being designed to suit various combat missions. 10 countries worldwide have purchased a variation of the F-35 including the UK who so far own 15 of the F-35B which are used by both the RAF and the Royal Navy and are intended as a replacement for the Harrier GR9 and Tornado GR4.

Corgi Showcase is a series of top quality die-cast model aircraft suitable for children aged five and over. Each model comes with a display stand. This series is ideal for the young aviation fan and offers a wide range of models to collect including biplanes, fighters, bombers and modern jets. [Age: 5 and up ]

CORGI - CS90630 Click to Enlarge M48 Patton Tank - Corgi Showcase Series

An extremely capable main battle tank, the M48 Patton was the third US tank to be named after the famous WWII general George S Patton who was a strong advocate of the use of tanks on the modern battlefield. Introduced in 1953, the M48 would be used extensively by American forces during the Vietnam War, where it would perform well, but more in an infantry support role, as opposed to tank destroyer. It would also go on to be an export success, seeing service with around twenty countries all over the world, with many still in service during the last years of the 20th Century.

Corgi Showcase is a series of top quality die-cast model aircraft suitable for children aged five and over. Each model comes with a display stand. This series is ideal for the young aviation fan and offers a wide range of models to collect including biplanes, fighters, bombers and modern jets. [Age: 5 and up ]

CORGI - CS90631 Click to Enlarge M3 A1 Half-Track - 41st Armored Infantry, 2nd Armored Division - Normandy 1944 (D Day) - Corgi Showcase Series

One of the key requirements of the modern battlefield is to have mobile infantry units supporting their heavy armor, both to protect the tanks and to secure any territorial gains they may have made. During WWII, the most famous Allied armored personnel carrier was the M3 Half Track series of vehicles, which were large enough to transport a fully armed squad of 12 troops and provide them with protection from small arms fire and shrapnel. Fast and extremely mobile, around 53,000 of these vehicles were built in several different combat configurations, proving to be one of the most useful armored fighting vehicles of the war.

Corgi Showcase is a series of top quality die-cast model aircraft suitable for children aged five and over. Each model comes with a display stand. This series is ideal for the young aviation fan and offers a wide range of models to collect including biplanes, fighters, bombers and modern jets. [Age: 5 and up ]

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